Green Burial

Lillian Clark


Clark-Lillian

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Lillian Clark passed away on October 31, 2013, at Lawrence Memorial Hospital after a short illness. She was born on June 19, 1923, in Oklahoma City, a daughter of John and Lillian (Eckroat) King.

At age 16, Mrs. Clark began college at the University of Oklahoma, majoring in Music. There she met her future husband, Louis Clark, and interrupted her college career to marry in 1942 and raise 11 children. She moved to Lawrence in 1977 and finished her degree at the University of Kansas in 1981 with a degree in music education and music therapy. She taught piano for most of her life. She attended St John Catholic Church in Lawrence. She celebrated her 90th birthday in June with a surprise party planned by her daughter, Mary.

Lillian Clark is survived by 10 of her children. These are daughters Ramona Hanrahan, Rosaleen Salvo of Gainesville FL, Teresa Dutton of Hutchinson KS, Mary Giles of Norcross GA, and Jenny Clark of Lawrence, and sons Philip of Santa Fe NM, Vincent of Asheville NC, Victor of Lawrence, John of Morrisville NC and Patrick of Burnsville NC. She is also survived by 14 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren, and by one sister, Joan Horn of Crystal River, FL.

One daughter Julianne Stephens passed away in 2008 and Louis Clark died in Tela, Honduras in 2006. Five siblings preceded her in death. They were brothers A. B., Paul, Ed, and Wilfred King, and sister, Mary Royston.

A Parish Rosary will be said at 6 p.m. Sunday, November 3, 2013 at Warren-McElwain Mortuary in Lawrence with visitation to follow until 8 p.m.

Mrs. Clark will be remembered with a Mass of Christian Burial at 10:30 a.m. Monday, November 4, 2013 at St. John the Evangelist Catholic Church. Burial will be at 1:30 p.m. Monday, November 4, 2013 with her parents at St Martin’s Catholic Cemetery in Piqua, KS.

Memorial contributions may be made in her name to the ASPCA or the American Cancer Society and may be sent in care of the mortuary.

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  • Charles Moon says:

    Lillian, just recently made contact with me. (Her email appeared suddenly just like common Oklahoma tornado – BUT! one of a SURPRISING WELCOME. ) We first knew each other some 70 years ago; We were Music Students at the U. of Okla. – way back in 1940. I had forgotten not only the Music Faculty but all of my classmates. Neither Lillian nor I could remember our fellow students; Lillian, however, remembered all of our teachers, which was and is a blessing for my memory. It is very hard to believe that our friendship of a few months had to end so quickly! If, per chance, other long lost fellow students from the early 40′s becomes known to me. I will definitely find out, especially for Lillian’s family, and forward those names to Lillian’s family – especially Mary Giles. Hopefully they will remember LILLIAN!
    Thanks Lillian for being a momentary part of memory pertaining to the time and remembrance of our teachers – “ONE UPON A TIME – WAY BACK WHEN! Charles Moon, Arcata, CA.

  • Mary Royston says:

    I am sorry for your loss.

    I will always remember my Aunt Lillian for her great smile, stories, life lessons, and music.

    She really enjoyed life and gave that gift to others.

    I could sit all day and listen to her play the piano. She was an amazing person!

    She will be missed.

    Mary Royston

  • Nicholas Lee says:

    When I think of Lillian, I remember her generosity. In every sense of the word, Lillian was a giver. She shared her music, her knowledge, her kindness, and most importantly her patience with me at a time when it seemed no one else would. She made me feel important and listened to every thought in my precocious head, regardless of how insignificant or eloquent its delivery.

    To know Lillian was to know my grandmother, her sister Mary, and her passing is a tremendous loss. It is rare to find a person who commits themselves to another person as completely as Lillian. Her generosity was a gift of another generation which will not be soon forgotten.

    Thank you, Lillian.